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mhymanbw“My parents are getting older and I want to do everything I can to help them prevent Alzheimer’s, considering both my grandmothers had this disease and I am worried about getting it too,” writes this week’s house call. “What can we do to prevent dementia?”

The truth is, dementia is a very big problem that’s becoming bigger every day.

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Statistics are grim. Ten percent of 65-year-olds, 25 percent of 75-year-olds and 50 percent of 85-year-olds will develop dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. And the fastest growing segment of our population is the 85-year-olds. Researchers predict Alzheimer’s will affect 106 million people by 2050. It’s now the seventh leading cause of death.

Scientists now call Alzheimer’s disease “Type 3 diabetes.” What’s the link between Alzheimer’s and diabetes? Well, new research shows insulin resistance or what I call diabesity (from eating too many carbs and sugar and not enough fat) is one of the major factors that starts the brain-damage cascade, which robs the memory of over half the people in their 80s, leading to a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.

But don’t think too much insulin affects only older folks’ memories. It doesn’t just suddenly occur once you’re older. Dementia actually begins when you’re younger and takes decades to develop and worsen.

Here’s the bad news/good news. Eating sugar and refined carbs can cause pre-dementia and dementia. But cutting out the sugar and refined carbs and adding lots of fat can prevent and even reverse, pre-dementia and early dementia.

More recent studies show people with diabetes have a four-fold risk for developing Alzheimer’s. People with pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome have an increased risk for having pre-dementia or mild cognitive impairment.

You don’t have to have full blown type 2 diabetes to develop brain damage and memory loss from high insulin levels and insulin resistance.

We all have heard of the mind-body effect. Well, there is also a body-mind effect. So you can impact your brain through your diet and heal your body. In fact, your body and your mind aren’t two separate systems; they’re one elegant, continuous ecosystem. What you do to the body affects the brain and what you do to the brain affects the body. I wrote about this mind-body connection years ago in The UltraMind Solution.

Cognitive decline and memory loss can be prevented and even reversed. We simply have to optimize brain function and then we see miracles. I’ve seen this happen many times in my medical practice.

When I put people on The Blood Sugar Solution, The 10-Day Detox Diet or on the plan in my new book Eat Fat, Get Thin, their memory, their mood and their well-being often dramatically improve.

The underlying causes of Alzheimer’s disease begin with too much sugar on the brain. The cycle starts when we over-consume sugar and don’t eat enough fat, which leads to diabesity. Diabesity leads to inflammation, which creates a vicious cycle that wreaks havoc on your brain.

If you looked at an autopsy of a brain of an Alzheimer’s patient, you’d see a brain on fire. This inflammation occurs over and over again in every chronic disease and very dramatically with the aging brain and overall aging process.

How to Reverse Memory Loss

The good news is you can reverse dementia and cognitive decline. To do that, you must control your insulin and balance your blood sugar levels, which will allow you to overcome diabesity and balance your mood, help your focus, help boost your energy level and prevent all of the age-related brain diseases including Alzheimer’s.

I’ve seen this happen with many patients. One, George, came with his wife to see me because he could no longer manage his business affairs. He had become increasingly less able to function at home and had to withdraw from family and social relationships. George was desperate because he felt himself slipping away.

We found that George had high levels of mercury. We helped him detoxify mercury with foods like kale, watercress and cilantro; herbs like milk thistle; nutrients like selenium and zinc; and medications that helped him overcome his genetic difficulties by ridding toxins like mercury.

We optimized his cholesterol with diet and herbs and we lowered his homocysteine (which comes from folic acid deficiency) with high doses of folate and vitamins B6 and B12. When people have high homocysteine, they have a dramatically higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s.

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