Megan Quinn Bachman

Megan Quinn Bachman is a journalist and environmental educator in Yellow Springs, Ohio. She is an award-winning reporter, columnist and photographer for the weekly Yellow Springs News, a columnist for the environmental news service website EcoWatch.com and adjunct instructor at Antioch University Midwest, where she teaches courses on ecology, environmental policy, sustainable agriculture and conservation. Bachman was formerly the outreach director for the Arthur Morgan Institute for Community Solutions, a Yellow Springs nonprofit, and a board member of the Association for the Study of Peak Oil and Gas (ASPO-USA), based in Washington D.C.

Bachman has written and lectured since 2003 on solutions to global climate change and peaking oil production and other environmental issues. She has organized six national conferences on peak oil and climate change in Michigan, Ohio and Washington D.C., spoken before nearly 100 groups, published articles in Permaculture Activist, Communities Magazine, WellBeing and Kindred and appeared in Harper’s Magazine and on MSNBC. Bachman co-wrote and co-produced the award-winning documentary film, The Power of Community: How Cuba Survived Peak Oil (2006), which has been translated into 14 foreign languages with more than 18,500 copies sold worldwide.

Bachman received a Bachelor of Arts in Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio and a Master of Science in Teaching (Earth Science) from Wright State University in Dayton.

She can be reached at [email protected].

babygmo

| December 17, 2013
Which brings me back to my little daughter, whose growing body is especially susceptible to toxins, and who...
solar_farm1

| June 22, 2012
What do these steps toward sustainability have in common? They all require an upfront capital investment, namely money. Initially, it takes some green to be green. Without financing the best...
gasprices

| April 9, 2012
Solutions that make petroleum less expensive not only make that long list of consequences worse, they delay our inevitable transition away from finite, fast-depleting underground fuels......
crisis

| March 12, 2012
What if a global economy awash in cheap, consumer goods—our chief pursuit over the last half century—has not made us happier?......
Granville schools’ executive chef Greg Enslen whips up a batch of tomato sauce. Enslen cooks from scratch using large amounts of  fresh ingredients rather than processed, canned products. Above is the unlimited fruit and vegetable bar at the elementary/intermediate school cafeteria, much of which is sourced locally. Photos provided by Granville School District

| February 2, 2012
If an alien species were to visit our school cafeterias at lunchtime, it might conclude that we don’t value the health and well-being of the most vulnerable members of our...

| December 4, 2011
If there is one unshakable belief in America today it’s that the U.S. economy can and must continue to grow. That’s why the messages delivered in November in Washington D.C....

| October 4, 2011
Some say that the best way to learn is to teach. In my second year as a college environmental educator, I have learned much more about my subject matter...

| August 2, 2011
Was I surprised that last issue’s column, Can Renewables Outshine Fossil Fuels?, elicited a strong reaction, with written responses of support and derision? Not at all. It’s an issue that...

| July 10, 2011
I'm not popular with environmentalists when I tell them that renewables can only provide a small fraction of the energy that fossil fuels do in powering industrial civilization. In fact,...

| April 10, 2011
In 2004 I was an idealistic young college graduate who hoped to change the world. I was convinced that the prospect of declining worldwide oil production loomed, and that people...

| March 10, 2011
Ohio, the home of John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil, and site of the world’s largest oil-producing provinces in the late 19th century, is again at the center of the action...

| January 10, 2011
A coal industry CEO told students at a small Quaker boarding high school to prepare for jobs in coal mines and power plants, rather than study philosophy or become community...

| November 10, 2010
It may seem strange that Ohio’s most successful food incubators are in the Buckeye State’s economically-depressed Appalachian southeast and in the heart of industrial agriculture in its northwest flatlands....

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